Switching on Smart Rwanda: Digital inclusion, collaboration and a G5 mindset 2021

According to the ICT Regulatory Tracker, Rwanda is a fourth-generation (G4) regulator. As a country that has put ICTs at the centre of its development since 2000, Rwanda has duly earned its recent entry into the small but growing club of African countries to be rated at the G4 level. G4 is characterized by integrated regulation, led by economic and social policy goals. G5, which is well within Rwanda’s grasp, has the important additional aspect of deep and meaningful collaboration as a means of achieving development-oriented digitalization and digital transformation.

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Tanzania – A solid base for moving to G5 regulation 2021

The ability to successfully collaborate, is one of the key building blocks of a digital economy, and a key marker of a fifth generation (G5) regulator. In an information and communication technology (ICT) sector known for change, G5 regulation represents yet another shift – not of technology, but of paradigm – for governments and regulators globally. G5 regulation forces the reconsideration of existing institutional frameworks and the harmonisation of policy priorities and regulatory rules in recognition of the interplay between digital infrastructure, services and content across industries and national borders.

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The benchmark of fifth generation collaborative regulation 2021

The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) has been advocating in the past years the need to implement a new approach to ICT regulation, labelled fifth generation collaborative regulation. The underlying premise of such an approach is the need for countries to migrate to a regulatory and policy framework based on the collaboration among multiple sectors and cross-sector regulators within a scope that expands beyond the ICT space into that of the digital economy. In this context, as part of its Global ICT Regulatory Outlook, the ITU launched a pilot version of The Benchmark of Fifth Generation Collaborative Regulation (G5 Benchmark) in 2020, with the objective of tracking the evolution of regulatory frameworks and helping countries establish roadmaps towards the new paradigm. The pilot edition of the G5 Benchmark covered more than 80 countries and has proven, so far, to be a powerful and straightforward tool for policymakers and regulators that sets new goals for regulatory excellence. More importantly, the Benchmark has become a reference in topics such as collaboration amongst regulators, and a design tool of policy and legal instruments seeking to maximize digital transformation across all sectors of the economy. Table of contents 1. INTRODUCTION 2. RESEARCH ON REGULATORY AND POLICY INDICES IN ICT AND THE DIGITAL ECONOMY Indices measuring trade barriers in telecommunications services Indices measuring the development of telecommunications regulatory and policy frameworks 2.3. Indices measuring the development of regulatory and policy frameworks applied to the digital economy 2.4. Conclusion Index of telecommunications Index of telecommunications 3. THE CURRENT INDUSTRY CONTEXT REQUIRES A NEW REGULATORY AND POLICY METRIC 3.1. The transition to a digital economy 3.2. The need of a digital policy agenda 3.3. The need for measuring cross-sector collaboration 4. THE G5 BENCHMARK 4.1. Benchmark design 4.2. Benchmark construction methodology G5 Benchmark Digital Economy Policy Agenda Policy Design Development Digital 4.3. Test of benchmark robustness 4.3.1. Benchmark framework Data availability and missing values Normalization and weighting Statistical coherence 4.3.5. Impact of modelling assumptions 4.3.6. Conclusion 5. BENCHMARK RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION 5.1. A worldwide perspective Graphic 6. G5 Benchmark versus Digital Economy Development Index 5.2. A view from the regions Digital Policy Design Digital G5 Economy Regulatory Development Policy Agenda G5 Benchmark 5.2.1. Africa Digital Policy Design Digital Economy Development Regulatory Policy Agenda G5 Benchmark Digital Policy Design Digital Economy Development Regulatory Policy Agenda 5.2.2. Americas G5 Benchmark Digital Policy Design Digital Economy Development Regulatory Policy Agenda G5 Benchmark Arab States Digital Policy Design Digital Economy Development Regulatory Policy Agenda G5 Benchmark 5.2.4. Asia Pacific Digital Policy Design Digital Economy Development Regulatory Policy Agenda G5 Benchmark Digital Policy Design Digital Economy Development Regulatory Policy Agenda 5.2.5. Commonwealth of Independent Nations G5 Benchmark Europe G5 Benchmark Digital Policy Design Digital Economy Development Regulatory Policy Agenda Digital Digital Economy Policy Design Development Regulatory Policy Agenda BIBLIOGRAPHY Annex A: List of members of Review Board Annex B: Detailed Methodology of the G5 Benchmark Annex C. List of countries in the G5 Benchmark 2020

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Collaborative regulation case study Moldova 2021

With its ups and downs, the Republic of Moldova has experienced an expansion of the economy by an average of 4.6 per cent annually over the past 20 years.1 The global pandemic, however, has left a significant mark – the gross domestic product (GDP) decreased by 7.0 per cent in 2020 and affected most sectors of the economy. According to a study by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the economic losses of the COVID-19 pandemic during 2020 affected some countries more than others. Countries with better broadband infrastructure and with broad use of ICTs among the population were able to mitigate part of the negative economic impact, allowing households, enterprises, and governments to continue their daily engagements during that time. Although Moldova’s economy is forecasted to rebound in 2021 with an expected 3.8 per cent growth in GDP, traces of the pandemic will remain well into the future. It is important, therefore, to consider the main lessons learnt from the pandemic. One clear lesson has emerged: inclusive connectivity is not an option, it is a necessity. The digital economy has become an enabler for traditional economic sectors in the Republic of Moldova, creating new markets and development opportunities. One less negative legacy of COVID-19 is the opportunity it has highlighted to drive forward with digital transformation.

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